HUD SECRETARY BEN CARSON – VAGUELY AWARE OF HISTORY?

UNITED STATES HUD SECRETARY BEN CARSON: VAGUELY AWARE OF HISTORY

Ben Carson is the man responsible for housing and urban development for many of America’s most disadvantaged cities and towns.

BY: Jeffrey Koopersmith, American Politics Journal – Editor Emeritus

 

10 March 2017

BEN CARSON-LISH, THE UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT REGARDING SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES

(“…as part of a 40-minute address to the employees and guests of HUD, and on the theme of America as “a land of dreams and opportunity,” was met with swift outrage online.” – The New York Times, 7 march 2017)

“There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships, worked even longer, even harder for less. But they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters, might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land.”

– Ben Carson, M.D.

What?

It took from 1618 until 1865 to be granted freedom in American law.  That is 248 years, or 13 generations of African-Americans just to find some freedom while many remained in slavery for decades after.  It took another 100 years for the Congress to pass a law that laid out, in not enough detail, to make the promises of the Civil War to come partially true.  It is now 2017, 404 years after the first slave ship hit American shores – 20 generations.  Yet, even today only the most fortunate Blacks live in some modicum of freedom, prosperity, and contentment, while 200 Thousand American Black WOMEN are in prison, and 750,000 Black MEN are in prison – many for non-violent crimes.

“According to the Federal census, in 1790, approximately 650,000 slaves worked with rice, tobacco, and indigo. By 1850 the country had 3.2 million slaves, 1.8 million of whom worked in cotton.”

  • – Henry Louis Gates, for PBS

HERE ARE THE FACTS DR. CARSON which you should remind us and yourself of – WITH NO WORDS TO CONFUSE OR ADDLE OR with ignorant references to only 60 years or three generations of slaves who soon rose to 11,000,000 (eleven million) in the Americans with as many as 3.5-4.0 million in the United States.

CHANGES TO SECRETARY CARSON’S REMARKS, recommended by Jeffrey Koopersmith, Editor Emeritus – American Politics Journal appear IN CAPITALS BELOW [www.americanspolitics.com)

 

“There were other CAPTIVES who came here, STARTING IN 1619 – THREE HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT YEARS AGO — in the BOTTOMOST deck of slave ships WITH SCRAPS OF CLOTHING OR NAKED, CHAINED OR WORSE ON THAT NETHERMOST WOOD FLOOR CONFUSED, HORRIFIED, DISMAYED, BATTERED, AILING, LIFELESS, RAPED, TORTURED and TOILING ON THOSE SLAVER SHIPS WITH THEM UNDER WHIPS for nothing, ZILCH;  AND they had NIGHTTERRORS and PERHAPS a dream – that one day, hundreds of years from then, their FAMILIES might DISCOVER FREEDOM, SOME prosperity, and AT LEAST A  SLIGHT OF CONTENTMENT in THE FORTHCOMING land, or AT MINIMUM, SOMEWHERE WITH LIBERTY.”

 

 

– MORE from Liverpool Museums.org..ok –

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/slavery/middle_passage/http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/slavery/middle_passage/

How the slaves were “packed”:
There are two ways for the captains to load their boats with slaves. One system is called loose packing to deliver slaves. Under that system, captains transported fewer slaves than their ships could carry in order to reduce the disease and deaths among   them. The other system is the cruelest one and is called tight packing. This system was based on the fact that the more slaves they had, the more profit they could make. They carried as many slaves as their ship could carry, and often more. In the ship’s hold, the slaves were chained ankle to wrist, with barely any place to move.

 

Sanitary/hygiene:
In the worst case, the captains did not provide any kinds of hygiene. In other boats, the captains placed buckets for the slaves’ excrements, but there was never one bucket per slave. Slaves who were close to the buckets used it but those who were farther away often tumbled and fell on others while trying to reach it. Severely hindered by the shackles that were tightly secured around their ankles, most slaves preferred to ease themselves where they were rather than to bruise themselves in the process of trying to reach it. Also, some sailors would be   ordered to go below deck to wash the slaves briefly.  Although the crew avoided the slaves, they often would call a woman on deck to satisfy their desires. When weather conditions were bad, the conditions of the quarters dramatically worsened. The slaves’ holding quarters were so hot and humid that the floor of their rooms was covered with layers of filth during most of the voyage

 

Death:
Suicide attempts occurred daily and in painfully cruel ways.  Slaves tried jumping overboard and even asked others to strangle   them. One of the most common ways to avoid further punishment on   the journey was to avoid eating. Starvation suicide attempts   became so common that a device was introduced to forcefully open   the mouths of slaves who refused to eat. Slaves believed that   their death would return them to their homeland and to their   friends and relatives. To prevent slaves from killing themselves, sailors began chopping the heads off of corpses, implying that   when they died, they would return to their homes headless. Even with precautions taken to avoid suicide attempts like drowning and starvation, many healthy and well-fed slaves died from what was known as “fixed melancholy.”

Food and water:
Food was a very big problem for the slaves and the captains. The captains often thought that food was too expensive, and tried to buy as little food as they could. Some captains chose to take a sufficient amount of food, believing that healthy slaves would be   worth the cost of the food. Many captains simply decided to buy   as less food as possible, even if much of their “cargo” died of starvation. The feeding of the slaves was on deck. The slaves were taken out cautiously, with sailors to feed them and many to guard them with loaded guns in order to prevent a slave rebellion. On other boats, the slaves were fed in the hold, by   sailors.

 

 

 

 

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